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HOW TO WRITE A RESUMÉ TO IMPRESS



Technology has changed the rules of the recruitment world and finding the next job opportunity has become much more complex than “knowing someone who knows someone.” Most of the time, landing your next career opportunity is outside the influence of your reliable network.


An effective resumé is more than a summary of jobs, buzzwords and a copy of past company profiles. A resumé must articulate how you are distinctively placed to solve a specific set of professional challenges, and why you should be hired over other, similar candidates.


If you're contemplating on how to write a resumé that positions you as the preferred candidate, then look no further. Here are some useful strategies you can use to write your own winning resumé and impress your next employer:


  • Plan the structure.

  • Next fill out the peripheral sections.

  • Apply a sleek design.

  • Load your resume with a fact based headline.

  • Choose your arrows with precision.

  • Fire with high-impact words.

  • Be professional.

1. Start by planning the structure


Crafting your resumé profile should be left for last. This is often where most people make a mistake, at kick-off.


Leave the profile blank until the very end. Instead, begin writing by planning your resumé structure. Once the structure is in place, start filling the blank

spaces.


2. Fill out the peripheral sections

This is where you fill out your education, specific board roles etc. Add job descriptions, ensuring your achievements are constructed efficiently. Use metrics to detail accomplishments.


Once all the peripheral sections are in place, write your professional resume profile; an executive summary of who you are as a professional.

2. Fill out the peripheral sections

This is where you fill out your education, specific board roles etc. Add job descriptions, ensuring your achievements are constructed efficiently. Use metrics to detail accomplishments.


Once all the peripheral sections are in place, write your professional resume profile; an executive summary of who you are as a professional.

3. Apply a sleek design

Avoid bright and boring resumé templates which make you look unprofessional.  This is an opportunity to be noticed and to make a first impression. Use it wisely. Think contemporary and easy to follow design.

4. Load your resumé with a fact-based headline.

Steer clear from the buzzword-overload generic statements.

Load your resumé with a fact-based headline that targets the role and career you are seeking, reinforced by relevant skills, achievements and specialisms.

For example:

  • IT Program Manager - CSM

  • Health Safety & Environment Manager - Statistical Analysist

  • Executive Sales Director - Acquisition& Business Development

  • Financial Controller - CPA

5. Choose your arrows with precision

Your resumé is your professional marketing document, not a record of your career. That means you have to narrow down the roles you are interested in, before you start writing your resumé.


This will enable you to target specific criteria of hiring managers by repositioning and contextualising aspects of your experience.

For example, you have been working at Better Homes for the past 10 years. You started as the office administrator, progressed into the sales team and got promoted a couple of times, and finally today ended up as Operations Manager.

That seems like a decent career decade to me.

If you decide your next step is securing a role as General Manager, your resumé will need to accentuate your management and leadership skills. You will need to write a resumé which demonstrates how you achieve results through others. However you choose to leverage your operations experience, you will need to irradiate some skills while placing others in the background.

6. Fire with high-impact words

Gone are the days where resumés were lengthy history records filled with buzzwords. Each word in your resumé needs to serve a unique purpose. You need to fire with powerful verbs and adjectives.

Keep bullet points short and powered with an action verb that reflects your experience and the role you are applying for.

Action verb examples: championed, spearheaded, led, drove, initiated, developed, mastered, directed).

Avoid buzzword overload. Everyone uses them and your goal is to be incomparable. Buzzwords include, “detail-orientated”, “motivated individual”, “strategic thinker”, “outcome driven”.

7. Be professional


Use a structured approach when writing. When you are listing your achievements, follow the what, how and why structure. Writing about your achievements is a very complex topic, so keep a lookout for our future blogs.


Exclude old roles. When you are writing your resumé, consider the targeted role when deciding which of your previous roles deserve to be included.


Include three to five most recent relevant roles from the past 10 to 12 years. List earlier career history in a summary section.


Ensure your sentences are fluent and to the point.


Ensure to write your professional profile in first person, this gives the recruiter or hiring manager an immediate connection with you and not a third person.


Avoid informal grammar and poor punctuation.


Save your resumé with a professional file name. (Mike Smith Resume vs Mike S resume daft 2020).


Writing a resumé is an art form-- it takes time, consideration and many recapitulations. We hope that with the use of our strategies, you can create the winning resumé to be able to set yourself apart from other applicants and land your dream job.


If you require further help, or if you need your resumé reviewed, get in touch with us at MADE Confident and take your career to the next level. You can view our packages online at http://www.madeconfident.com.au/packages or email us at hello@madeconfident.com.au



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